Leid Stories Stories and news that affect us all

October 2, 2015  

Claim Your Intellectual Sovereignty! Free Your Independent Mind!

No “herd mentality” here. It’s Free Your Mind Friday on Leid Stories, and it’s expected that you have a strong, well-thought-out opinion about something.

We’re waiting to hear it. Call in (888-874-4888) and share.

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October 2, 2015  

The Constitution and CitizenshipThe Dred Scott Decision (Conclusion)  

We conclude today the discussion on the Dred Scott decision of 1857 – a case often cited as producing the worst ruling in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Legal scholar Paul Finkelman, who teaches constitutional law, legal history, and race and the law at Albany Law School in New York, gave us, in two consecutive weeks, a detailed background of the case and the constitutional questions it raised.

Dred Scott, enslaved at birth – around 1799, in Southampton County, Virginia – sued for his freedom and the freedom of his wife and two daughters, on the grounds that they had lived in Illinois and the Wisconsin Territory, where slavery had been outlawed. But the Supreme Court, in a 7-2 ruling, said that no person of African ancestry ever was meant to be a citizen of the United States, nor to benefit from any rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

Today we hear from Justice Stephen Breyer, an associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court, on the matter.

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September 30, 2015  

Identity Politics and the 2016 Presidential Race

An Answer to the Question Often Asked of Immigrants

Louis DeSapio, professor of political science and of Chicano and Latino Studies at the University of California-Irvine and coauthor of the recently released Uneven Roads, An Introduction to U.S. Racial and Ethnic Politics, talks about the intersection of race, identity and immigration in the 2016 presidential race.

Host Utrice Leid in a commentary answers a question often asked of immigrants: “Why did you come to America?”  

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September 29, 2015  

Fiat Chrysler Workers in Detroit Reject Contract; Strike Ahead?

Obama Goes Professorial, but Gets Read, at 70th U.N. General Assembly

A four-year tentative contract negotiated between the auto workers union and Fiat Chrysler appears headed for recall. More than 40,000 members of the United Automobile Workers currently are voting on whether to ratify the contract, but so far the UAW’s largest locals have voted against the deal.

Greg Gardner, labor reporter for the Detroit Free Press, explains why workers are against the contract and whether their thumbs-down on it is a harbinger of contract negotiations with Ford and General Motors. The Big 3 auto manufacturers employ about 141,000 workers.

At the opening of the 70th United Nations General Assembly in New York yesterday, President Barack Obama was in full professorial mode, lecturing world leaders about international affairs. Several of them conducted teach-ins of their own that corrected the teacher’s syllabus.

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September 28, 2015  

Holier Than Thou: The Role of Religion in the 2016 Presidential Race

The 2016 presidential race has unleashed a devil’s brew of marketing ploys—chief among them a distinctly nativist “American Christian” religiosity.

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), was the first to tout his evangelical credentials to the [self-] righteous. In early April, in a bid to woo evangelicals, his campaign ran a 30-second spot, titled “Blessing,” in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada—the states with the earliest primaries.

In the ensuing months, the candidates’ religious beliefs, and religion as a whole, have featured prominently in media coverage of the presidential campaign. Leid Stories discusses the role of religion in shaping electoral choices.

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September 25, 2015  

Your Opinions and Ideas Are Premium on ‘Free Your Mind Friday!’

It’s Free Your Mind Friday on Leid Stories, and listeners’ opinions and ideas take center stage in this open forum.

Call in (888-874-4888) and either start or be part of the conversation.

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September 24, 2015  

The Constitution and CitizenshipThe Dred Scott Decision (Part 2)  

Last week, when the nation observed Constitution and Citizenship Day, Leid Stories began a discussion on how these two things are connected and are at the root of American “identity.”

One case, decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1857, proved then, and still proves to this day, that neither the Constitution nor citizenship was meant to be of benefit to all Americans. Known as Dred Scott v. Sandford, the court ruled that African Americans, specifically, whether enslaved or free, were neither meant to be beneficiaries of constitutional rights nor its protections as citizens.

Legal scholar Paul Finkelman, who teaches constitutional law, legal history and race and the law at Albany Law School in New York, is presented here discussing the constitutional origins of the issue of citizenship in a detailed examination of the landmark Dred Scott case.

Why is this case important? Why should you know about it? Because it is the formal articulation—by the nation’s highest court, no less—of the answer to the still-roiling question: Who is a citizen of the United States of America?

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September 23, 2015  

Auto Workers Begin Voting on New Contracts. Deal or No Deal?

Starving for Education in Chicago: Hunger Strikers Fight for A School  

About 40,000 workers are voting this week on whether to ratify a new four-year contract their union, the United Auto Workers, has worked out with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. All eyes in the auto industry are looking for the outcome, which might predict how contract negotiations with General Motors and Ford Motor Co. will go as well. The industry employs 141,000 people.

Two longtime union workers discuss their concerns about the contract-negotiation process, the concessions they say the UAW has made, the definitive change in workers’ rights and benefits, and the outsourcing of jobs.

It took a 34-day hunger strike by 15 activists to force Chicago Public Schools to reopen the   historic Dyett High School, shut down last year. But the fight’s just beginning, say the strikers, who envision the creation of the Dyett Global Leadership and Green Technology High School, and the rebirth of community control over education in the City of Chicago.

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September 22, 2015  

Behind the Headlines: Pope Francis, President Xi Jinping Visit the U.S.; Chaos in Europe; A Military Coup in Burkina Faso; and the 2016 Presidential Race

Dr. Gerald Horne, the John J. and Rebecca Moores chair of history and African American studies at the University of Houston and frequent analyst of world affairs on Leid Stories, provides unique insights on several major news issues and developments.

Topics include the Pope’s visit to Cuba and the United States; President Xi Jinping’s six-day trip to the U.S.; the rapidly escalating refugee crisis in Europe; the military coup in Burkina Faso; and the 2016 presidential race.   

Horne has written more than 30 books, and more than 100 scholarly papers and reviews, on struggles against imperialism, colonialism, fascism, racism and war. 

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September 22, 2015  

Ben Carson: So Fanatical, So Bigoted, So Wrong, On So Many Levels

The Mysterious 23-Month Gap In Hillary Clinton’s Haiti Emails

Republican presidential candidate and self-professed man of God Ben Carson has made it plain: The nation’s highest office should be off-limits to Muslims. Further, he contends Islam is not “consistent” with the U.S. Constitution.

Zahra Billoo, executive director of the Bay Area office of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, weighs in on Carson.

Of the 7,945 emails of former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made public so far, 391 pertain to Haiti—a country at the heart of several questionable political and financial dealings involving the Democratic presidential candidate and her family.

Kim Ives, cofounder of the international weekly newspaper Haïti Liberté, discusses a mysterious 23-month gap in Clinton’s emails on Haiti.

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